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A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com.

The federal government’s decision to revoke Temporary Protective Status (TPS) for hundreds of thousands of Salvadoran citizens who work legally in the U.S. had an immediate impact in greater Washington, where the majority of recipients live. Individuals, many of whom work in the construction and service industries, worry that they will lose their jobs or be deported before the program officially ends in September 2019, but plan to lobby Congress to let them stay. The region’s elected officials also expressed concerns about what this loss of labor could mean for the local economy.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

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  • Telemundo Washington will hold a phone bank to answer questions about TPS on Jan. 8 and 9. Call (202) 885-4949. [NBC Washington]

  • D.C. ranks second in pest control company’s list of U.S. cities with bedbug issues. [Post]

  • A man planned to pick up nine lbs. of weed in Southwest, but the police got it first. [NBC Washington]

  • Malik Milleris the tallest player for the Friendship Tech Titans and the second-leading rebounder in the nation. [WTOP]

  • Customs agents at Dulles Airport discover close to $55,000 worth of fake Air Jordan sneakers. [NBC Washington]

  • Capitol Hill Crab Cakes in Anacostia closes after pipes burst in the cold snap. [WUSA9]

  • Two boats caught fire in Southwest, D.C. Monday morning, and then sunk. [WUSA9]

  • Students at Washington Mathematics Science Technology PCS have created a plan to clean the Anacostia River. [WJLA]

  • D.C.-based nap studio flames out on Shark Tank. [WBJ]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY:

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by City Paperstaff (tips? tips@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Metro riders confirm that they do want their money back when rush hour trains are late. [WAMU]

  • MetroNow Coalition wants WMATA to have dedicated local and federal funding and a smaller board. [WBJ]

  • Women share their experiences with sexual harassment on public transportation. [Post]

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Watch the music video for Bat Fangs’ new single, “Rock the Reaper.” [Stereogum]

  • Don’t miss performances by Black Alley, Rare Essence, EU, and Trouble Funk this week. [DC Music Download]

  • Two theater leaders step down from their D.C.-area companies. [Post]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Win a corrupt media award fromTrump? José Andrés will buy you lunch. [Post]

  • Where D.C. journalists bide their time, including Dolcezza and Room 11. [Vogue]

  • Old Town Alexandria might get a Taco Bell Cantina. [WBJ]

  • Feast your eyes on the prettiest food from coast to coast. [Eater]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Andrew Giambrone (tips? agiambrone@washingtoncitypaper)

  • Foreign real estate investors rank D.C. among most desirable areas in the U.S. [WBJ]

  • D.C. Housing Finance Agency pilot program brings more workforce housing to Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods. [UrbanTurf]

  • D.C. plans an $18 million replacement for the Southwest Neighborhood Library. [WBJ]

  • D.C.’s historic districts, explained. [GGW]

  • Douglas Development acquires retail property on M Street NW in Georgetown. [Bisnow]

  • New Google Earth plug-in shows how sea-level rise could affect the District. [UrbanTurf]

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