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A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com.

The graduation issues that were first reported at Ballou High School are present throughout D.C. public high schools, Mayor Muriel Bowser announced at a press conference Monday. One in three graduates throughout the system didn’t attend enough classes or were improperly enrolled in make-up classes. A report from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education places the blame on the central office and on a leadership culture that encourages educators to promote students to the next grade, even if they aren’t prepared.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • Bundle up! Wind follows this mornings brief snow squall. [NBC Washington]

  • ACLU sues the U.S. Marshals for evicting a Southeast D.C. woman in 2015. [WJLA]

  • D.C. firefighter helps save neighbor whose house caught fire Monday. [WTOP]

  • Family members remember 16-year-old Taiyania Thompson, who was shot and killed last week. [Post]

  • Now that the Cleveland Indians will dump their racist mascot, is the Washington football team next? Probably not! [Washingtonian]

  • Georgetown professor accused of calling German airport officers “Nazi police.” [Post]

  • How to see the super blue blood moon that will rise over Washington on Wednesday. [WAMU]

  • The story of one of the region’s most iconic (and annoying!) TV jingles. [Washingtonian]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY:

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by City Paperstaff(tips? tips@washingtoncitypaper.com)

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Arts editor Matt Cohen and WCP film critic Alan Zilberman discuss Oscar nominees and the problems with D.C.-set movies. [WCP]

  • Rising Broadway stars Ethan Slater and Noah Robbins got their start at Georgetown Day School. [Post]

  • Rhizome co-founder Steve Korntalks about experimental art in the District. [DC Music Download]

  • How Children’s National Health System utilizes creative and therapeutic arts services for its patients. [East City Art]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Visit three new places where you can pick up fresh loaves of bread. [WCP]

  • Gaslight Tavernis open and going for a 1920s feel. [Eater]

  • Drift on 7th and French Quarter Brasserie both close in Shaw. [PoPville]

  • Bold Biteonly lasted four months on 19th Street NW. [Washingtonian]

  • Visit these 18 restaurants in 2018. [DC Refined]

  • The lawsuit between the Glover Park Whole Foods and its landlord continues. [WBJ]

  • Even though it’s a hotel, locals are enjoying The LINE DC. [WTOP]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, byAndrew Giambrone (tips? agiambrone@washingtoncitypaper)

  • Flooding displaces families from a Sanford Capital property in Southeast. [WCP]

  • The FBI HQ could remain in its current D.C. location after all. [WBJ]

  • D.C. developer UIP buys apartment building in Capitol Riverfront for $95.5 million. [WBJ]

  • The District’s Home Purchase Assistance Program excludes those who need it. [GGW]

  • D.C. unveils some amendments to its Comprehensive Plan for development. [GGW]

  • Study suggests the D.C. area has enough housing to easily accommodate Amazon workers. [UrbanTurf]

  • A recent auction of vacant D.C.-owned properties netted $12.3 million. [UrbanTurf]

  • Residential development will begin on the St. Elizabeths campus this summer. [Bisnow]

  • Coalition of mayors and business leaders push for more affordable housing. [CityLab]

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