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A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com.

For the past six years, we’ve devoted an issue to the burning questions our readers can’t solve on their own. This year was no different—we’ve explained why the traffic signals on Georgia Avenue seem out of sync, figured out what the deal is with an African nation’s empty plot of land, and decoded the pronunciation of one very confusing street name. Heck, we even got a prominent U.S. senator to come out in support of D.C. statehood!

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • A powerful ocean storm could bring D.C. its windiest day in years tomorrow. [WTOP]

  • MPD officers are still stopping and frisking innocent black individuals. [WUSA9]

  • After racist incidents on campus, some AU students are upset the university’s Founders Day ball will be held at the NMAAHC. [WUSA9]

  • Maryland senator wants a formal review of D.C.’s low-performing VA Medical Center. [NBC Washington]

  • Student project and talent show bumps March For Our Lives from National Mall. [Post]

  • Instead of beating up speed cameras, let’s make them more reliable. [GGW]

  • Why does D.C. freak out about snow? Blame traffic and the government. [WAMU]

  • Meet Millennium Falcon, the red-tailed hawk living at the National Cathedral. [Post]

  • Since Olympic victory, local curling clubs are getting more customers. [Washingtonian]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY:

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Andrew Giambrone (tips? agiambrone@washingtoncitypaper.com)

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  • Vince Gray takes aim at Muriel Bowser over Ellington residency scandal. [Times]

  • Amid scandals, new DCPS Interim Chancellor Amanda Alexander talks goals. [FOX5]

  • D.C. area school leaders have security on their minds post-Parkland shooting. [WAMU]

  • Bowser/Adrian Fenty Green Team supports Michigan congressional candidate. [District Links]

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Good luck getting Hamilton tickets. [Washingtonian]

  • “Listen to local music,” says Post pop music critic Chris Richards. [Post]

  • Speaking of local music, read how rapper-poet-actor-playwright Dior Ashley Brown takes inspiration from both Shakespeareand Mobb Deep. [Post]

  • Arena Stage announces its 2018/2019 season, featuring productions of Anything Goes, JQA, The Heiress, and Kleptocracy. [Post]

  • And Ford’s Theatre’s 2018/2019 lineup features Born Yesterday, A Christmas Carol, Twelve Angry Men, and Into the Woods. [DC Theatre Scene]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, byLaura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • What’s life like for women who work security at D.C. clubs? [WCP]

  • Restaurateur Ashok Bajaj will tackle Israeli cuisine in Cleveland Park. [Washingtonian]

  • Get a first look inside the Cherry Blossom PUB. [BYT]

  • A cafe celebrating Wards 7 and 8 will open near Union Market this summer. [WBJ]

  • Capital Burger, from the Capital Grille team, opens this month across from the convention center. [Eater]

  • SNAP benefits are already too low and could get worse with further cuts. [Post]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Morgan Baskin (tips? tips@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • The Bowser administration wants to make it harder to legally challenge luxury development projects. [Post]

  • Which properties are historic and which aren’t? These days, it’s hard to tell. [GGW]

  • Rent prices increased more slowly in D.C. over the last year than in other large cities, like Seattle and Las Vegas. [CNBC]

  • Falls Church officials will release an RFP today for one of the city’s largest development projects in recent history. [WBJ]

  • Fannie Mae will lease 850,000 square feet of office space in Reston. [WBJ]

  • Maryland legislators are pushing for a $5 billion incentive package to entice Amazon to choose Montgomery County for HQ2. [WAMU]

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