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Pack your umbrellas and ponchos this morning: Heavy rain—what the Capital Weather Gang is calling a “vicious springtime cyclone”—will hit the city today, with a flash flood watch in effect from noon to 5 a.m.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • Heads up: Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway will be closed this weekend.

  • Elon Musk’s D.C.-Baltimore “Hyperloop” looks much less impressive than originally planned. In a 400-page draft environmental assessment of the project, released this week by the Department of Transportation, the Boring Company estimates that initial daily ridership capacity will be only 1,000 in each direction every day. As WAMU points out, that’s less than the capacity of an eight-car Metro train.

  • A Georgetown University study of 40 Uber drivers in D.C. found that one-third reported “assaults or safety concerns,” and that many reported going into debt to work for the company.

  • The current occupant of the White House is a fan of Dan Snyder, saying he’s “done a very good job.”

  • Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed 195 bills into law on Thursday, among them a measure to establish a commission that will research racially motivated lynchings in Maryland.

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Mitch Ryals (tips? mryals@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Attorney General Karl Racine wants to create a Civil Rights Division. [DC Line]

  • All the D.C. places in the Mueller report. [WAMU]

  • Racine’s office opened an investigation into allegations that a teacher sexually abused preschool students at the Washington Hebrew School. [Post]

  • ICYMI: Maryland Rep. Andy Harris and marijuana legalization activists do not get along—and it’s personal. [Baltimore Sun]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Restaurateur Robert Wiedmaier is suing OpenTable for $4.12 million. [WCP]

  • Ballston Quarter Market’s newest stall combines sushi rolls and dumplings. [WCP]

  • Where to head for passover dinner if you don’t feel like cooking. [Washingtonian]

  • Cookbooks that will come in handy on 4/20. [Post]

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Scena goes short with evenings dedicated to Pinter and Beckett. [WCP]

  • Coming back to the Air and Space Museum: Neil Armstrong’s space suit. [Post]

  • All the music festivals in the region you can’t miss this spring and summer. [Post]

  • Mosaic Theater pays tribute to Richard Wright in Native Son and Les Deux Noirs. [WCP]

  • At D.C.’s newest gallery, an exhibit that sounds maddening. [DCist]

  • Film review: Teen Spirit is a portrait of pop stardom without much insight. [WCP]

  • Film review: Her Smell gives an encore we didn’t ask for. [WCP]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Morgan Baskin (tips? mbaskin@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • ICYMI: Longtime senior official at the DC Housing Authority, Ron McCoy, resigned abruptly at the end of last monthleaving his staff, and legal advocates who worked regularly with him, reeling.

  • An illustrated guide to ANC meetings. [Medium]

  • Is a lack of recreational cannabis dispensaries keeping D.C. home prices in check? [Urban Turf]

  • A long(-er) read from WTOP about what gentrification looks like in D.C. [WTOP]

SPORTS LINKS, by Kelyn Soong (tips? ksoong@washingtoncitypaper.com)

HAPPENING TODAY, by Kayla Randall (tips? krandall@washingtoncitypaper.com)

OFFICE OF FUTURE PLANNING

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